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Monday, 30 March 2020

Poems to live for: live webinars from the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine

To raise spirits in these very troubled times, the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine is launching a series of live webinars on Poems to live for.

See the Poems to Live for website for details about how to join the sessions by computer/laptop/smartphone or by dialling in by phone.

There will be discussions on poetry. Invited poets around the world will read a poem that seems full of the spirit that's worth living for, and will say why this poem means so much to him/her.  Sessions will also provide updates from the 2020 Hippocrates Prize  and other activities of the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine.

The organisers also welcome suggestions for poems in English (out of copyright) from contributors from anywhere in the world would like read. Contributors should email suggestions or a link to a reading of a favourite poem (must not your own AND must be out of copyright).
Please email your suggestions or links to a reading to hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com

Programme for the first live session:

Poems to Live for

Session 1Wednesday 8th April 9pm UK time

Introduction
Michael Hulse

Contributors

Michael Hulse, UK, Luz Mar Gonzales, Spain, Geoffrey Lehmann, Australia, Professor John Stein, UK, Lawrence Sail, UK, Donald Singer, UK.


Short-lists announced for the 2020 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine
Open shortlist: announced by judge Geoffrey Lehmann, Australia
Health Professional shortlist announced by judge Professor John Stein, UK
Young poets short list: announced by judge Lawrence Sail, UK


Readers include 

Michael Hulse, UK
Luz Mar Gonzales, Spain

Friday, 27 March 2020

European Medicines Agency advises continued use of medicines to treat hypertension, heart failure and kidney disease

27.3.20: Briefing from the European Medicines Agency
EMA reports that it is aware of recent media reports and publications which question whether some medicines, for instance angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs, or sartan medicines), could worsen coronavirus disease (COVID-19). ACE inhibitors and ARBs are most commonly used for treating patients with high blood pressure, heart failure or kidney disease. 
The EMA has providing the following advice from its Public and Stakeholders Engagement Department.
"It is important that patients do not interrupt their treatment with ACE inhibitors or ARBs and there is no need to switch to other medicines. There is currently no evidence from clinical or epidemiological studies that establishes a link between ACE inhibitors or ARBs and the worsening of COVID-19. Experts in the treatment of heart and blood pressure disorders, including the European Society of Cardiology, have already issued statements along those lines. To gather more evidence, EMA is proactively reaching out to researchers working to generate further evidence in epidemiological studies.
As the public health crisis rapidly extends across the globe, scientific research is ongoing to understand how the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) reproduces in the body, interacts with the immune system and causes disease, and whether ongoing treatment with medicines such as ACE-inhibitors and ARBs could impact the prognosis of COVID-19.
The speculation that ACE-inhibitors or ARBs treatment can make infections worse in the context of COVID-19 is not supported by clinical evidence. These medicines work by affecting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Because the virus uses a target called angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), which is part of this system, to enter human cells, and the medicines can increase ACE2, one of the suggestions among others is that they could also increase virus activity. However, the interactions of the virus with the RAAS in the body are complex and not completely understood.
EMA is monitoring the situation closely and is collaborating with stakeholders to coordinate epidemiological studies on the effects of ACE inhibitors and ARBs in people with COVID-19.
EMA is helping to coordinate urgent ongoing research and is fully committed to keep the public up to date with any development in this field. EMA is also aware of reports questioning whether other medicines such as corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) could worsen COVID-19, and has recently issued a communication on NSAIDs medicines. It is important that patients who have any questions or are uncertain about their medicines speak to their doctor or pharmacist and do not stop their regular treatment without speaking to their healthcare professional first.
Medicines should be prescribed and used in line with clinical judgement, taking due note of any warnings and other information provided in the summary of product characteristics (SmPC) and thepackage leaflet, as well as guidance issued by the WHO and relevant national and international bodies.
Within the EU medicines regulatory network, evidence on the safe use of medicines is reviewed as it emerges. Any new advice that arises is disseminated appropriately through EMA and national competent authorities.
EMA will provide further information as appropriate.
This information and related content are published here. Please check EMA’s dedicated webpage on COVID-19 for the latest updates."

Wednesday, 25 March 2020

New International Awards from the FPM for trusted Medical Writing in Social Media


Medical society the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine is partnering with its journals – Health Policy and Technology and the Postgraduate Medical Journal – to launch international awards for well-informed, clear writing on health matters in social media. 
Patients, members of the public, health professionals and policymakers increasingly use social media as a source for health information and to guide important decisions on choices and actions about prevention and treatment of disease. Where the information is accurate and easy to follow, this can be very helpful. However, we are increasingly at the mercy of a spectrum of unreliability, from incomplete or inaccurate reports, to claims that inconvenient truths are ‘fake news’.

These are not new problems. Sinclair Lewis in his geopolitical satire of 1935 It Can’t Happen Here refers to fake news in the political domain [1]. George Orwell features unreliable reporting by government-controlled media in his dystopian 1984 [2]. However, the geographical reach and speed of spread of reports in current social media and present numerous ways to disseminate ‘alternative facts’ have new global implications for the consequences ofunreliable ‘news’ [3].

Concerns in the health sector include social media posts making spurious health claims for ‘alternative medicines’ and containing misinformation about causes, severity and treatments of disease – from coronaviruses [4] and HIV infection [5] to cancers [6]. A striking example of the serious impact on the public of misinformation is a sustained large increase in vaccine hesitancy for measles and other immunisations since the late 1990s [7]. This arose from a later withdrawn report in the Lancet of a link between autism and measles immunisation [8]. Although findings in the report were judged to be fraudulent, anti-vaccine activists persist in providing misleading information on social media based on this report. Particularly worrying is how difficult it continues to be for international public health authorities to counter this vaccine hesitancy. Immunisation rates against measles remain sub-optimal 22 years after the original flawed report [8]. Social media undoubtedly plays a role here, and its potency is reflected in the fact that just one source is enough to disseminate and propagate untruths [9]. However, this very potency also represents a means to inform and educate patients, members of the public, health professionals and policymakers.

The FPM International Awards for Medical Writing in Social Media are new annual awards for medical graduates from anywhere in the world. To be eligible, an article or blog must be in English and should have been published online between 1st July 2019 and the closing date for the awards: 30th June 2020. There will be up to 5 prizes per year. Each award winner will receive a £100 prize. Award winners will also have winning content published in one of the FPM’s journals, either Health Policy and Technology or the Postgraduate Medical Journal.

For more details and information about how to enter online, see the website for the FPM International Awards for Medical Writing in Social Media.

References
1. Sinclair Lewis. It Can’t Happen Here. 1935, Doubleday, Doran and Company. ISBN 045121658X.
2. George Orwell. Nineteen Eighty-Four: A Novel.  1949, Secker and Warberg. OCLC 470015866.
3. Launer J. The production of ignorance.  Postgrad Med J 2020 xxxxxx.
4. Frédéric Lemaître. China denounces being placed under quarantine. Le Monde. 4th February 2020.
5. National AIDS Trust. HIV fake news: NAT sets out to tackle misinformation. December 1st, 2017
 www.nat.org.uk/press-release/hiv-fake-news-nat-sets-out-tackle-misinformation Accessed 4th February, 2020.
6. Bessi A, Coletto M, Davidescu GA, et al. Science vs conspiracy: collective narratives in the age of misinformation. PLoS One. 2015;10:118093.
7. Vaccine Hesitancy. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. www.ecdc.europa.eu/en/immunisation-vaccines/vaccine-hesitancy Accessed 29th January 2020.
8. Retracted Lancet 2010;375:445: Wakefield AJ, Murch, SH, Linnell J et al. Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children. Lancet 1998;351:637-641.
9. Waszakab PM, Kasprzycka-Waszak W, AlicjaKubanek, A. The spread of medical fake news in social media – The pilot quantitative study. Health Policy Technol 2018;7(2):115-118.

COVID-19: Beware of falsified medicines from unregistered websites

25.3.20: News from the European Medicines Agency
The EMA is urging the general public not to buy medicines from unauthorised websites and other vendors aiming to exploit fears and concerns during the ongoing pandemic of coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
Vendors may claim that their products can treat or prevent COVID-19 or may appear to provide easy access to legitimate medicines that are otherwise not readily available. Such products are likely to be falsified medicines.
Falsified medicines are fake medicines that vendors pass off as real or authorised. They may contain the wrong or no active ingredient or the right ingredient in the wrong amount. They may also contain very harmful substances that should not be in medicines. Taking such products can lead to severe health problems or a worsening of your condition.
To protect yourself from fraudulent vendors, only buy medicines from a local pharmacy or retailer or from an online pharmacy that is registered with the national competent authorities. You can find the lists of registered online pharmacies in EU countries via EMA’s website or directly from websites of the national competent authorities.
All registered online pharmacies have a common logo which you can use to confirm that the site is registered. The logo consists of a rectangle with horizontal stripes and a white cross placed in the left half of the rectangle adjacent to the midline. Below this is the flag of the EU country where the online pharmacy is registered.
 
Before buying a medicine from a site, check that the site has the logo and then click on it. You will then be taken to the website of your national authority and shown a list of all legally operating online pharmacies. Check that the online pharmacy you have visited is listed there before continuing with your purchase. If it is not listed, do not buy any medicine from that site.
 
 
Keeping safe when buying medicines
  • Falsified medicines can cause serious harm
  • When buying over the internet, only use registered online pharmacies
  • Check that the online pharmacy you are using has the common logo
  • Click on the logo and confirm that the online pharmacy is listed on the national authority website
  • Do not buy medicines advertised as cures or preventive treatments for COVID-19. To treat COVID-related symptoms such as fever, discuss with your doctor or follow advice from authorities
The public is reminded that there are currently no treatments authorised for COVID-19. Medicines are available for treating symptoms such as fever in line with advice from your doctor or pharmacist.
In the event of a shortage of any medicines, you should follow the advice of your doctor, pharmacist or national competent authority. You can find some information about ongoing shortages on the websites of EMA and the national competent authorities.
This information has been published on our website with related content. Please check EMA’s dedicated webpage on COVID-19 for the latest updates.
You have received this mail because you have registered in the EMA stakeholders database and subscribed to receive this kind of information. However, if you no longer wish to receive such communications from us, please send an email to StakeholdersDB@ema.europa.eu to unsubscribe.
We would be grateful if you could disseminate this email to anyone else who might be interested in this information.

The above release was disseminated by the EMA's Public and Stakeholders Engagement Department
Amsterdam | The Netherlands

Sunday, 30 June 2019

European cooperation on healthcare discussed at FPM-HPT conference at Erasmus University in Rotterdam

European cooperation is crucial for providing the highest possible quality of healthcare for the ~740 million citizens on the continent. Innovations in European healthcare also have a vital impact on global health.
Many international organizations and institutes participate in European projects and initiatives on research, clinical care and health policy to achieve health goals that would be unattainable when operating solely within one’s own country.
IMG_7043
Donald Singer, Carin Uyl-de Groot, Marlies Wijsenbeek, Liese Barbier, Ken Redekop and Lytske Bakker
There are also funding, ethical and political challenges to effective European cooperation on healthcare, including an impending possible Brexit. 

The latest Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine conference was held at Erasmus University in Rotterdam in the Netherlands on 21st June 2019 to consider European Cooperation on Healthcare. The aim was to provide a forum for discussing best practice across the above key healthcare domains.

IMG_7072
Donald Singer, Ron de Winter, Marjan Hummel, Marcus Guardian, Lytske Bakker and Ken Redekop
The conference was jointly hosted by the FPM’s Elsevier-published journal Health Policy and Technology and the Erasmus School of Health Policy and Management (ESHPM), with as local organisers Associate Professor Ken Redekop (HPT Editor-in-Chief) and researcher Lytske Bakker (HPT Commissioning Editor).

Content from the meeting will appear in the HPT journal as Editorials, commentaries, review articles and Meet the Expert reports, with associated short video interviews with speakers posted on the HPT and FPM websites.

IMG_7078 (1)
Poster prize winner Vivian Reckers-Droog with Ken Redokop (L) and Donald Singer
Ron de Winter from the Department of Epidemiology at the University Medical Center in Utrecht, The Netherlands discussed combating multi-drug bacterial resistance in the multi-country European COMBACTE public-private partnership.

IMG_E7047
Poster presenters and European Reference Network Project Managers Olivia Spivack and Renée de Ruiter.
Barbara Pierscionek, Associate Dean for Research at Nottingham Trent University discussed ethical and legal challenges when developing joint programmes involving European cooperation on healthcare. Issues include maintaining confidentiality when sharing real world data within Registries and other Big health Data.

IMG_7034 
Pharmacist Liese Barbier, European Medicines Agency, discussed European Medicines Agency perspectives on regulating biosimilars. She stressed the importance of batch-level information when reporting any suspected adverse drug reactions from biosimilars or corresponding biological medicines.
Jorge Gonzalez, Spain, spoke on the EU funding supported inDemand model now operating in Spain, France and Finland, with additional network partners throughout Europe. InDemand makes a virtue of needs-driven rather than technology-driven project commissioning as a more reliable approach to ensuring adoption of new approaches into clinical practice. Examples included mobile health applications to reduce weight in obese children and e-health systems to support management of women in pregnancy.
Marcus Guardian, CEO of EUnetHTA, The European Network for Health Technology Assessment discussed his organisation’s role in cross-border assessment of health technology.

IMG_E7069 
Ines Hernando from the EURORDIS-Rare Diseases Europe organization discussed the initial impact of the 2017 European Reference Network Directive to improve the care of the ~ 30 million patients in Europe with rare diseases. The new European Reference Networks are already providing virtual common rare disease management support platforms for health professionals across the European region.
Marjan Hummel from Philips in Einthoven discussed early health technology assessment in the medical device industry and resulting international implications for streamlining development of new health technologies.

IMG_7059 
Zoltan Kalo, Professor of Health Economics at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest discussed ways to improve equity in allocation of healthcare research funds by the European Union. Currently there appears to be a disproportionate allocation of EU research awards to EU15 countries. This both disadvantages research capacity development in EU13 countries and leads to a ‘brain drain’ of researchers from EU13 to EU15 research centres.

IMG_7051 

Local host Ken Redekop, Editor-in-Chief of the FPM’s Elsevier-published Health Policy and Technology journal, discussed themes and opportunities for publication in the journal on topics from across the diagnostics/drugs/devices/e-health spectrum complemented by papers on health technology adoption and associated health policy implications.



Donald Singer, President, Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine, London discussed engaging with European health policy makers, including new networking opportunities between health professional and patient and consumer organisations and EU institutions such as the European Medicines Agency.


IMG_7039 
 Carin Uyl-De Groot, head of health technology assessment at the Erasmus School of Health Policy & Management in Rotterdam discussed sustainability and affordability of innovative drugs. She described discussion with European policy makers on ways to reduce the cost of expensive biological treatments. Developing cross-border partnerships would create much greater bargaining power for purchasing medicines. For example, the EU region currently provides 40% of the market for most pharmaceuticals.

Respiratory physician Marlies Wijsenbeek from the Erasmus Medical Centre discussed patient registry development to improve management of and research into rare lung diseases, based on her work on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. She noted the potential value of developing cross-border patient registries for rare diseases, to ensure larger patient populations then possible within individual countries. She also illustrated some of the challenges, e.g. when common data sets are not agreed and when the same patients may feature within different registries.



Wednesday, 20 February 2019

Freshness, wonder and passion: enter the international Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine: deadline 1st March 2019

Hippocrates Young Poets Prize deadline – midnight on 1st March

Entries remain open for The Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine – an international prize for a single unpublished poem in English on a medical theme from young poets aged 14-18 years from anywhere in the world.

Entries are free for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine
The award for the winner is £500 (~ USD 670).

The length of the poem should be not more than 50 lines of text in addition to the title and any line breaks. The 2019 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize is supported by healthy heart charity the Cardiovascular Research Trust.  The charity has a particular interest in avoiding preventable heart disease through educating the young.

Enter online, by email or post for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine.

Young Poet entrants should be aged 14 – 18 years old on the closing date for entries – 1st March 2019 – entrants can be from anywhere in the world. There have already been entries for the 2019 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize from 11 countries: Argentina, Australia, England, Hong Kong, Ireland, Nigeria, Scotland, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland and the USA.

Short-listed and commended poets will be notified in early April. Winners of the Hippocrates Young Poet Prize and the FPM-Hippocrates Awards will be announced at the 2019 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony, which will be hosted by the Centre for Life in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in England.
Heart charity patron Leslie Morgan OBE DL said: “The CVRT is delighted to have such international interest in the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize. The CVRT is also grateful that the 2019 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony will be held at the Centre for Life in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the UK at the 10th annual international Hippocrates conference on poetry and medicine, which is being jointly organised by the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine and the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts.
New Zealand poet and novelist Elizabeth Smither will judge the Hippocrates international Young Poet Prize for Poetry and Medicine. Elizabeth Smither said: “Young poets have something that old poets don’t. Freshness, wonder, passion before the difficulty of being a poet is fully understood. No fear at looking at the blank page or blank screen. The whole world of words at their feet.”
With a prize fund of £5500 for winning poems in the Open International category and international health professional category, and £500 for the international Young Poets Award, the Hippocrates Prize is one of the highest value poetry awards in the world for a single poem.
Judges for the 2019 Hippocrates international Open Prize and Health Professional Prize (deadline 14th February) are UK journalist and broadcaster Kate Adie CBE, DL; American-Mexican poet and novelist Jennifer Clement, International President of PEN International; and physician Professor Dame Jane Dacre, who is immediate past-president of the UK Royal College of Physicians in London and a Professor of Medical Education. Jennifer Clement said: “When science and poetry come together this often creates great literature.”
Co-organiser Donald Singer said: “We are delighted to have such a distinguished panel of judges for the 2019 Hippocrates Prize. We are also grateful that the 2019 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony will be hosted by the Centre for Life in Newcastle in partnership with the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts.”
Centre Director Professor Sinéad Morrissey added: “The Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts is delighted to co-host this important international poetry prize – one which is growing in status and reputation each year, making vital contributions to both fields of knowledge.”
Co-organiser Michael Hulse said: “Our tenth anniversary year promises to be one of real distinction, and we look forward eagerly to reading the poems that take this year’s prizes and commendations.”
The International Hippocrates Prize is awarded in three categories:
– a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the FPM-Hippocrates Open category, which anyone in the world may enter. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Open category
– a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the FPM-Hippocrates Health Professional category, which is open to Health Service employees, health students and those working in professional organisations anywhere in the world involved in education and training of health professional students and staff. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Health Professional category
– a £500 award for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for an unpublished poem in English on a medical theme. Entries are open to young poets from anywhere in the world aged 14 to 18 years. There are further commendations in the Young Poets category. There is no entry fee for the Young Poets prize.
The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.
Notes for editors
For more on the Hippocrates Prize contact +44 7494 450805  or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com

Support for the 2019 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize
The 2019 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize is supported by the Cardiovascular Research Trust, a healthy heart charity founded in 1996, which promotes research and education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation. The charity has a particular interest in avoiding preventable heart disease through educating school students.

The 2019 FPM-Hippocrates Open Awards and FPM-Hippocrates Health Professional Awards are supported by the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. The FPM, founded in 1918,  is a UK medical society which publishes the international journals the Postgraduate Medical Journal and Health Policy and Technology.
2019 Hippocrates Judges
The 2019 Hippocrates Awards judging panel includes BBC journalist Kate Adie from the UK, US-Mexican poet and novelist Jennifer Clement, and past-president of the UK Royal College of Physicians Professor Dame Jane Dacre, for the International Open and International Health Professional categories; and, for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize, poet and novelist Elizabeth Smither from New Zealand.
Kate Adie became a familiar figure through her work as BBC Chief News Correspondent. She is the long-serving presenter of Radio 4’s From Our Own Correspondent and a presenter or contributor to many other radio and television programmes. She has served as a judge for the Orange Prize for Fiction, now the Bailey’s, and the Whitbread, now the Costa Prize, and recently, the RSL Ondaatje Prize. Kate was honoured with a Bafta Fellowship in 2018 and received a CBE in the 2018 Queen’s Birthday Honours list. Other awards include: Royal Television Society Reporter of the Year 1980, for her coverage of the SAS end to the Iranian Embassy siege; Winner, 1981 & 1990, Monte Carlo International Golden Nymph Award; The Richard Dimbleby BAFTA Award 1990.
Jennifer Clement is the President of PEN International and the first woman to be elected as its President in 100 years. Under her leadership the PEN International Women’s Manifesto was created. Clement has published four books of poetry including The Next Stranger (with an introduction by W.S. Merwin). She is the author of A True Story Based on Lies, The Poison That Fascinates, Prayers for the Stolen and Gun Love.  She also wrote the acclaimed memoir Widow Basquiat on New York City in the 1980’s and the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat. Her books have been translated into 30 languages. She is the recipient of the Canongate Prize, Sara Curry Humanitarian Award, the Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an NEA Fellowship, and her books have twice been a New York Times Editor’s Choice Book.  Prayers for the Stolen was both a PEN/Faulkner Prize and Femina Prize finalist. Her recent novel Gun Love is an Oprah Book Club Selection as well as being a National Book Award finalist. She lives in Mexico City.
Elizabeth Smither has published 18 collections of poetry. She was New Zealand’s Poet Laureate from 2001 to 2003, and was awarded an Hon DLitt by Auckland University and the Prime Minister’s Award for Literary Achievement in 2008. She also writes novels, journals and short stories, and is widely published in Australia, Britain and USA. She was awarded the Sarah Broom Poetry Prize in 2016 and her most recent poetry collection, Night Horse, won the Ockham NZ Book Award for poetry in 2018.
Professor Dame Jane Dacre DBE, MD, FRCP is a UK consultant rheumatologist and Professor of Medical Education. She is the immediate past president of the London Royal College of Physicians and was vice chair of the Association of Medical Research Charities, Director of University College of London Medical School, MD of MRCPUK and academic VP of the RCP. She is the lead for the DHSC independent review into the gender pay gap in medicine, and the President of the Medical Protection Society. She won the medicine and healthcare category 2012 of Women in the City Woman of Achievement Award; was named on the HSJ inaugural list of 50 inspirational women in healthcare in 2013; was named in the science and medicine category for people of influence Debrett’s 500 in 2015, 2016 and 2017; and was named on the HSJ top 100 list from 2014 to 2017.
Organisers of the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine
Professor Donald Singer is a clinical pharmacologist and President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. His interests include research on discovery of new therapies, and public understanding of drugs, health and disease. Professor Michael Hulse is a poet and translator of German literature, and teaches creative writing and comparative literature at the University of Warwick. His latest book of poems, Half-Life (2013), was named a Book of the Year by John Kinsella.

Tuesday, 12 February 2019

Still time to submit an abstract for the EACPT Congress in Sweden: 29th June to 2nd July 2019

The next EACPT Congress will be held from 29th June to 2nd July in 2019 in Stockholm as a partnership between the EACPT and the Swedish Society for Pharmacology, Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 

The Congress will address Tomorrow’s Healthcare Challenges and will be held at the City Conference Centre – 5 minutes from Stockholm Central Station.

Abstract closing date extended to 14th March.

Register online 

The Congress Reception on the evening of Saturday 29th June, will be held at Stockholm City Hall, the venue of the Nobel Prize banquet.

The Keynote Opening Lecture will be given by the President at the Karolinska Institute, Professor Ole Petter Ottersen, on global health and clinical pharmacology.

Around 60 invited speakers are expected from throughout Europe and beyond. Congress keynote lectures, sessions and themes will include:
  • Advanced therapies
  • Chronic disease
  • Clinical pharmacologists versus computers
  • Closing the money gap
  • Drug regulation in the 2020’s
  • EACPT meets Asian Societies
  • EPHAR-EACPT joint symposium on personalised medicine
  • Ethics in clinical research
  • Global Health
  • How to become a clinical pharmacologist
  • How to measure drug exposure
  • How to measure drug use
  • How to perform a health economic study
  • Interprofessional exchange for better drug treatment
  • Misuse of medicines
  • Patient empowerment
  • Preparing tomorrow’s prescribers
  • Prescribing and deprescribing
  • Targeting small populations
  • The critically ill patient
  • Treating ageing populations
  • Treating cancer
  • Treating children
Major awards to be presented at the Stockholm Congress include the EACPT Lifetime Achievement Award and the biennial EACPT Scientific Award for best publication on a clinical pharmacology or therapeutic theme.

Opportunities for EACPT Associate Members include
* discounted registration fees for EACPT meetings
* networking with colleagues worldwide through the global EACPT network of Associate Members
* active involvement in EACPT Working Parties and other activities


Find out how to become an Associate Member of the EACPT

Future EACPT Congresses will be held in:
– 2021 Athens
– 2023 Rotterdam


The EACPT was founded in 1993 and now includes as members all national organisations for clinical pharmacology in Europe, as well as organisations from further afield internationally. The EACPT aims to provide educational and scientific support for the more than 4000 individual professionals interested in clinical pharmacology and therapeutics throughout the European region, with its congresses attended by a global audience. The EACPT also advises policy makers on how the specialty can contribute to human health and wealth.

Monday, 11 February 2019

1st March deadline for 2019 Hippocrates International Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine

The Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine is an international prize for a single unpublished poem in English on a medical theme. The length of the poem should be not more than 50 lines of text in addition to the title and any line breaks. 
Entrants should be aged 14 - 18 years old on the closing date for entries - 1st March.
Entries are free for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine.
The award for the winner is £500 (~ USD 670). 
Entries for the 2019 Hippocrates Young Poet Poetry and Medicine Prize close at 12 midnight ie the end of the day on 1st March 2019 in the international time zone for entrants or -  if by mail - postmarked on1st March at latest. 

Enter online, by email or post for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine.

The Hippocrates Young Poets Prize
 is supported by healthy heart vharity the Cardiovascular Research Trustwhich promotes education for the prevention and treatment of disorders of the heart and circulation.


Since its launch in 2013, the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for Poetry and Medicine has attrac
ted entries from Europe, North America, Africa, Asia and Australia, with winners from the USA, the UK and Hong Kong. 


Heart charity patron Leslie Morgan OBE DL said: “The CVRT is delighted to have such international interest in the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize. The CVRT is also grateful that the 2019 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony will be held at the Centre for Life in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the UK at the 10th annual international Hippocrates conference on poetry and medicine, which is being jointly organised by
the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine and the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts.


New Zealand poet and novelist Elizabeth Smither will judge the Hippocrates international Young Poet Prize for Poetry and Medicine (age 14-18 years; deadline 1st March). Elizabeth Smither said: “Young poets have something that old poets don’t. Freshness, wonder, passion before the difficulty of being a poet is fully understood. No fear at looking at the blank page or blank screen. The whole world of words at their feet.” 

Shortlisted poets will be informed by email and information about the shortlist and the commended entries posted on the Hippocrates Prize website. The winners in the 2018 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize will be announced at the Hippocrates Awards ceremony on Friday 11th May 2018 at the Poetry Foundation in Chicago.


The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.

Notes for editors
For more on the Hippocrates Prize  contact +44 7494 450805  or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com



2019 Hippocrates Young Poets Prize judge 
Elizabeth Smithers

2019 Elizabeth Smither photograph
Elizabeth Smithers is a poet who lives in New Zealand. Elizabeth Smither has published 18 collections of poetry. She was Te Mata Poet Laureate (2001-3), and was awarded an Hon DLitt by Auckland University and the Prime Minister’s Award for Literary Achievement in 2008. She also writes novels, journals and short stories, and is widely published in Australia, Britain and USA. She was awarded the Sarah Broom Poetry Prize in 2016 and her most recent poetry collection, Night Horse, won the Ockham NZ Book Award for poetry in 2018.

Hippocrates Prize Organisers
Professor Donald Singer is a clinical pharmacologist and President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. His interests include research on discovery of new therapies, and public understanding of drugs, health and disease. Professor Michael Hulse is a poet and translator of German literature, and teaches creative writing and comparative literature at the University of Warwick. He is also editor of The Warwick Review. His latest book of poems, Half-Life (2013), was named a Book of the Year by John Kinsella.

When health and poetry come together: the 10th annual Hippocrates International Prize for Poetry and Medicine

Entries are now open for the 2019 Hippocrates Prize for Poetry and Medicine.
Since its launch in 2009, the Hippocrates Prize has attracted around 10,000 entries from over 70 countries, from the Americas to Fiji and Finland to Australasia. Entries for the 10th annual Hippocrates Prize close on 14th February (1st March for the Hippocrates Young Poet Prize).
Awards in the Hippocrates Prize are for an unpublished poem in English of up to 50 lines on a medical theme by entrants from anywhere in the world. Previous winners have come from Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand, the UK and the USA.
With a prize fund of £5500 for winning poems in the Open International category and NHS category, and £500 for the Young Poets Award, the Hippocrates Prize is one of the highest value poetry awards in the world for a single poem.
Judges for the 2019 Hippocrates international Open Prize and Health Professional Prize (deadline 14th February) are UK journalist and broadcaster Kate Adie CBE, DL; American-Mexican poet and novelist Jennifer Clement, International President of PEN International; and physician Professor Dame Jane Dacre, who is immediate past-president of the UK Royal College of Physicians in London and a Professor of Medical Education. Jennifer Clement said: “When science and poetry come together this often creates great literature.”
New Zealand poet and novelist Elizabeth Smither will judge the Hippocrates international Young Poet Prize for Poetry and Medicine. Elizabeth Smither said: “Young poets have something that old poets don’t. Freshness, wonder, passion before the difficulty of being a poet is fully understood. No fear at looking at the blank page or blank screen. The whole world of words at their feet.” 
Co-organiser Donald Singer said: “We are delighted to have such a distinguished panel of judges for the 2019 Hippocrates Prize. We are also grateful that the 2019 Hippocrates Awards Ceremony will be hosted by the Centre for Life in Newcastle in partnership with the Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts.”
Centre Director Professor Sinéad Morrissey added: “The Newcastle Centre for the Literary Arts is delighted to co-host this important international poetry prize – one which is growing in status and reputation each year, making vital contributions to both fields of knowledge.”
Co-organiser Michael Hulse said: “Our tenth anniversary year promises to be one of real distinction, and we look forward eagerly to reading the poems that take this year’s prizes and commendations.”
Awards in the Hippocrates Prize are for an unpublished poem in English of up to 50 lines on a medical theme by entrants from anywhere in the world. Previous winners have come from Canada, Hong Kong, New Zealand, the UK and the USA.
The International Hippocrates Prize is awarded in three categories:
- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Hippocrates Open category, which anyone in the world may enter. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Open category
- a £1000 first prize, £500 second prize and £250 third prize in the Health Professional category, which is open to Health Service employees, health students and those working in professional organisations anywhere in the world involved in education and training of health professional students and staff. There are a further ~20 commendations in the Health Professional category
- a £500 award for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize for an unpublished poem in English on a medical theme. Entries are open to young poets from anywhere in the world aged 14 to 18 years. There are further commendations in the Young Poets category. There is no entry fee for the Young Poets prize.
US poet and 2018 Hippocrates Prize Judge Mark Doty said: “The humane and moving work shortlisted for the Hippocrates Poetry Prizes testify to the power of poetry to help us to negotiate the difficult in carefully crafted, artful language”.
Australian doctor, poet and 2018 Hippocrates Prize Judge Peter Goldsworthy added: “There are many species of poem (in the 2018 Hippocrates Prize entries) - dark, poignant, epigrammatic, celebratory, funny. I applaud the poets for their creativity and compassion.”
Shortlisted and commended poets will be informed by email and information about the shortlist and the commended entries posted on the Hippocrates Prize website. The winners in the 2019 Hippocrates Health Professional Prize will be announced by the judges at the Hippocrates Awards ceremony on Friday 17th May 2019 in at the Centre for Life in Newcastle-upon-Tyne.

The Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine – winner of the 2011 Times Higher Education Award for Innovation and Excellence in the Arts – is an interdisciplinary venture that investigates the synergy between medicine, the arts and health.
Notes for editors
For more on the Hippocrates Prize contact +44 7494 450805  or email hippocrates.poetry@gmail.com 
2019 Hippocrates Judges
The 2019 Hippocrates Awards judging panel includes BBC journalist Kate Adie from the UK, US-Mexican poet and novelist Jennifer Clement, and past-president of the UK Royal College of Physicians Professor Dame Jane Dacre, for the International Open and International Health Professional categories; and, for the Hippocrates Young Poets Prize, poet and novelist Elizabeth Smither from New Zealand.
Kate Adie became a familiar figure through her work as BBC Chief News Correspondent. She is the long-serving presenter of Radio 4’s From Our Own Correspondent and a presenter or contributor to many other radio and television programmes. She has served as a judge for the Orange Prize for Fiction, now the Bailey’s, and the Whitbread, now the Costa Prize, and recently, the RSL Ondaatje Prize. Kate was honoured with a Bafta Fellowship in 2018 and received a CBE in the 2018 Queen's Birthday Honours list. Other awards include: Royal Television Society Reporter of the Year 1980, for her coverage of the SAS end to the Iranian Embassy siege; Winner, 1981 & 1990, Monte Carlo International Golden Nymph Award; The Richard Dimbleby BAFTA Award 1990.
Jennifer Clement is the President of PEN International and the first woman to be elected as its President in 100 years. Under her leadership the PEN International Women’s Manifesto was created. Clement has published four books of poetry including The Next Stranger (with an introduction by W.S. Merwin). She is the author of A True Story Based on Lies, The Poison That Fascinates, Prayers for the Stolen and Gun Love.  She also wrote the acclaimed memoir Widow Basquiat on New York City in the 1980’s and the painter Jean-Michel Basquiat. Her books have been translated into 30 languages. She is the recipient of the Canongate Prize, Sara Curry Humanitarian Award, the Gran Prix des Lectrices Lyceenes de ELLE, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an NEA Fellowship, and her books have twice been a New York Times Editor’s Choice Book.  Prayers for the Stolen was both a PEN/Faulkner Prize and Femina Prize finalist. Her recent novel Gun Love is an Oprah Book Club Selection as well as being a National Book Award finalist. She lives in Mexico City. 
Elizabeth Smither has published 18 collections of poetry. She was New Zealand’s Poet Laureate from 2001 to 2003, and was awarded an Hon DLitt by Auckland University and the Prime Minister’s Award for Literary Achievement in 2008. She also writes novels, journals and short stories, and is widely published in Australia, Britain and USA. She was awarded the Sarah Broom Poetry Prize in 2016 and her most recent poetry collection, Night Horse, won the Ockham NZ Book Award for poetry in 2018.
Professor Dame Jane Dacre DBE, MD, FRCP is a UK consultant rheumatologist and Professor of Medical Education. She is the immediate past president of the London Royal College of Physicians and was vice chair of the Association of Medical Research Charities, Director of University College of London Medical School, MD of MRCPUK and academic VP of the RCP. She is the lead for the DHSC independent review into the gender pay gap in medicine, and the President of the Medical Protection Society. She won the medicine and healthcare category 2012 of Women in the City Woman of Achievement Award; was named on the HSJ inaugural list of 50 inspirational women in healthcare in 2013; was named in the science and medicine category for people of influence Debrett’s 500 in 2015, 2016 and 2017; and was named on the HSJ top 100 list from 2014 to 2017.
Organisers of the Hippocrates Initiative for Poetry and Medicine
Professor Donald Singer is a clinical pharmacologist and President of the Fellowship of Postgraduate Medicine. His interests include research on discovery of new therapies, and public understanding of drugs, health and disease. Professor Michael Hulse is a poet and translator of German literature, and teaches creative writing and comparative literature at the University of Warwick. His latest book of poems, Half-Life (2013), was named a Book of the Year by John Kinsella.